Sheherazade Becomes Marginal in a Society that Embraces Apathy

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When you live in a society where shallowness is embraced, there will be a mass following of people who imitate shallowness.

You see, the elite can only thrive with a mass following, by creating a mass appeal, popularity.

The merciless thrive by exploiting the basic human desires, and brand their strategies with the facade of “love” or “humanity.”

This shallowness is a form of turbulence — keeping us distracted, distancing us from Light.

Light can seem invisible with turbulent vision; yet the wise know Light continues to radiate in full spectra in undetected forms.

The wise know to be wary of “charming” promises, as Plato says “Things are not what they appear.”

It is only those placed in liminal states who are able to contrast between discourses.

But you see, our state of being is not a static entity. Circumstances can harden us, circumstances can soften us —

Can one be so optimistic these days?

Something new is occurring in human history, with humans being hardened into objects, irreversibly.

Resistance is strategically kept powerless and marginal.

If only Foucault was alive to see his biopolitics now.

The once optimistic feeling of softening the soul is being negated in a new social transformation who’s future is unknown.

Long ago, Sheherazade softened the heart of King Shariyar. But this was a time when the art of wisdom was embraced by the ruling elite.

Once, people were aware of the dehumanization resulting from objectification.

An objectified human becomes inanimate, lacking substance — yet this obsolescence is embraced!

Now, increasingly, the art of wisdom is silenced, and instead ‘information’ prevails.

Modern education is information, not knowledge — and the marginal are drowning.

A life of simulated shallowness, avarice and merciless individualism is propagated as “the promise” and masks the greedy profit that lies underneath

I have softened the hearts of many men. Though, I am limited in the abundance of human drones.

A drone is taught to valorise surfaces only, like the body; it cannot detect the emotional depth of the soul.

How foolish of me to consider myself a Sheherazade in a society that is morally bankrupt!

You see, in a world where shallowness prevails, the shallow ideals will be rewarded.

Oh, the days when I was an object, I only attracted objects!

Oh, I am fully aware, that if I transformed myself into a walking simulation of stupidity (a shapely ass and big pair of tits as my sole identity), then I will reign popularity.

But you see, now, I refuse to be an inanimate object.

How could anyone be an object once they’ve reached their soul?

I speak in a language that cannot be comprehended so easily,

it will only resonate by those immersed in Love.

My silence speaks this language.

My God, I am so thankful You reign in my heart, radiating Your Beauty

The burning of my heart keeps me from solidifying into a cold, hardened object. I’m melting in Your bliss.

Love will shine, it radiates in all forms to those whose surfaces are still permeable.

-Myself

*The tale of Scheherazade is symbolic in showcasing that wisdom is what makes a human worthy of being. Scheherazade changed King Shahriyar’s murderous vengence towards women, and inevitably softened his heart. How? She used her wisdom, her knowledge — she was not simply an object. The symbolism has relevance to today’s context: When a human is simply an object, devoid of inner depth, they become perceived as insignificant, disposable as an inanimate object. Sadly, it has become a trend in modern societies for people to identify in objectifying manners, thereby neglecting the ripening of their inner beings. This trend is a reflection of the ‘popular’ social values that are advertised by all forms of media/social media. 

___________

set free

“They have taken us prisoners,

They’ve locked us up.

But that’s nothing…

The worst

is when people –knowingly or not —

carry prison inside themselves”

-Nizam Hikmet

(trans. Sisir Kumar Das 378)

___________

Do Panjereh

(…)

always been a distance

between your hands and mine.

always with this bitterness

our days and nights have passed.

 *

there is not a very long distance between us, but

(even this short distance) seems so far.

the only connection between you and me

is the kind caressing hands of wind.

*

we are forced to stay captive.

we will stay captive as long as we live.

for us the only way to freedom is death.

as soon as we are set free, we will die.

*

Oh, I wish this wall would fall down

so that you and me will die together

and in another world

we will be able to hold hands, be together.

may be in that other world,

the pain of shunning and hatred wont exists in hearts.

(may be in that new world) between their windows

wont be any barrier of walls.

-Googoosh

13 Comments

Filed under My Poetry and Others

13 responses to “Sheherazade Becomes Marginal in a Society that Embraces Apathy

  1. My love, reading your writing is satisfying to the heart, like sipping a cup of carefully prepared Arabic coffee, spicy with cardamom, rich with cream. It soothes your soul with its sweetness, stimulates the senses, wakes you up.
    The world needs to drink of wisdom like yours and wake up to real beauty.

  2. Amazing thoughts and prose.How did you compose it

  3. Aphrodite

    I’m so happy you still believe in Love. Let your heart never become Cold.

  4. Steve

    Fascinating … I have been studying philosophy in a religious seminary for years and you have been apart of a world , which on the surface seems to be diametrically opposite to my world . And yet we arrive at the same conclusion

    • Aphrodite

      Hi Steve, as a loyal follower of Sahar’s blog, I was also boggled by these seemingly opposite ‘ways of thinking’ (can I call it that way, Sahar?), at first. But if you continue reading, you realize this ‘moral dissonance’ will gradually fade. At least in my case, it did.
      And I want to thank you for that Sahar. I’ve been struggling with identity from the moment I was cognitively able to ponder about existential questions. And it did get worse when I started escorthing.
      But I have to admit your blog helped me ‘to get things straight’.

    • escortdiary

      Thank you for sharing that.

  5. iaroslaus

    I’m not an expert in Islamic thought, but your writing very much reminds of a Sufi treatise. My guess is that all epochs had shallow people, and the wise have always been a minority.

  6. Why a person understands things or realizes reality only after he finds that everything else is just finite and not real? You believe that you have realized that, but there are so many out there. who are on the similar path as you are. You will not be able to stop them, and they will end up writing a blog later, speaking about true beauty, feelings and faith. Once the things are destroyed, you can only live with whatever has been done and just do aftermath for the sake of yourself.

  7. Though i must say you are very artistic as a writer. It displays your depth of feelings and knowledge, in spite of the fact what is your occupation.

  8. Scythian

    There is a very touching Talmudic story from Menachot 4a Chapter. Not sure how plausible it is, but it sounds so humane and magnanimous:
    “It was taught: R. Nathan said: There is not a single commandment written in the Torah, even the lightest, whose reward is not enjoyed in this world; and as to its reward in the world to come I do not know how great it is. Go and learn this from the commandment of Tzitzit (fringes).
    Once there was a man, who was very careful about the commandment of Tzitzit. He heard about a certain harlot in one of the towns by the sea who charged a fee of four hundred gold coins for her hire. He sent her four hundred gold coins [in advance] and scheduled a time [to meet her]. When his time arrived he came and sat at her door step. The harlot’s maid told her: “The man who sent you four hundred gold coins is here and is waiting at the door”; to which the harlot replied “Let him come in”. He came in.
    The harlot prepared for him seven beds, six of silver and one of gold; and between one bed and the other there were steps of silver, but the last were of gold. She then went up to the top bed and sat upon it naked. He too went up and sat naked next to her, when [all of a sudden] the four fringes (Tzitzit) of his garment struck him across the face; he slipped off the bed and fell upon the ground. She also [let herself fall] and sat upon the ground.
    She said to him; “By the Roman Capitol (A form of oath. According to Rashi: By the head of Rome, referring to the Emperor), I will not leave until you tell me what blemish you saw in me.” He replied: “By the Temple (the service of the Temple), never have I seen a woman as beautiful as you are; but there is one commandment which God has commanded us, that is called Tzitzit, and with regard to it the expression “I am the Lord your God” is written twice, signifying, I am He who will exact punishment in the future and I am He who will give reward in the future. The Tzitzit appeared to me as four
    She said; I will not let you go until you tell me your name, the name of your town, the name of your teacher, and the name of your school in which you study the Torah.” He wrote all this down and handed it to her. Thereupon she arose and divided her estate into three parts; one third for the kingdom, one third to be distributed among the poor, and one third she took with her in her hand; the bed linen she kept.
    She [then] came to the house of study of Rabbi Chiyya, and said to him, ‘Master, give instructions that they may make me a convert’. ‘My daughter’, he replied; ‘perhaps you have set your eyes on one of my students?’ She thereupon took out the paper and handed it to him. ‘Go’, said he ‘and enjoy your acquisition’…
    Those very bed-linen which she had spread for the student for an illicit purpose she now spread out for him lawfully.
    This was his reward in this world. And as far as the reward in the world to come, I do not know.”
    It is also said that that man and woman later got married lived a happy and blissful life.

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